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     Thomas Jefferson was born on April 13, 1743, at Shadewell, Virginia. He grew up in a large family, having 10 brothers and sisters, 2 of which died at birth. His father, Peter Jefferson, was a planter and his mother Jane Randolph was the daughter of a ship’s captain.  His first childhood memory was at the age of three, and was about a 50- mile horseback ride he took with his father’s slave, into Virginia wilderness.This journey was undertaken with his family as they moved to a plantation that Jefferson’s father was to manage, acting as executor of a friend’s estate. Along with his parents and three siblings—three other sisters and one brother were later born to the family—Jefferson spent the next six years roaming the woods and studying his book.     According to an article titled “Thomas Jefferson,” from the History channel, During the revolutionary war which occurred in 1775 through 1783, Jefferson served in the Virginia legislature and the Continental Congress and was governor of Virginia. He later served as U.S. minister to France and U.S. secretary of state, and was vice president under John Adams (17-1801). Jefferson served in the office as president for 2 terms from 1801 to 1809.     In 1800 the US held its 4th presidential election from October 31st 1800 to December 3, 1800. The article from the history channel titled “Thomas Jefferson is elected,” talked about how  Jefferson seemed well-suited to run for president since he drafted the declaration of independence and he had quite a bit of political background. The article said how the candidates of the election were democratic- republicans Jefferson and Aaron Burr and Jefferson. The federalist candidates were John Adams, John Jay, and Charles C. Pickney. After a bloodless however ugly campaign within which candidates and authoritative supporters on each side used the press, usually anonymously, as a forum to fire  volleys at one another, then the laborious and confusing method of vote began in April 1800. Individual states scheduled elections at completely different times and though President Jefferson and Burr ran on an equivalent price ticket, as president and vice president severally, the Constitution still demanded votes for every individual to be counted one by one. As a result, by the top of Jan 1801, President Jefferson and Burr emerged tied at seventy three electoral votes each. Adams came in third at sixty five votes.    One factor that raised Jefferson’s odds of getting to be President was the general mood of the nation. Amid the Adams administration, open discontent had ascended because of the Alien and Sedition Acts, an immediate duty in 1798, Federalist military arrangements, and the utilization of government troops to pound a minor expense disobedience drove by John Fries in Pennsylvania. Therefore, Jefferson appreciated a considerable amount of mainstream bolster for his restriction to Adams’ arrangements.According to an article called ” Jeffersonian Ideology” written by the Independence Hall Association, “His presidential vision impressively combined philosophical principles with pragmatic effectiveness as a politician. Jefferson’s most fundamental political belief was an absolute acquiescence in the decisions of the majority. Stemming from his deep optimism in human reason, Jefferson believed that the will of the people, expressed through elections, provided the most appropriate guidance for directing the republic’s course.” The authorization of The louisiana purchase in 1803 was one of Jefferson’s most well known actions he took place in on terms of domestic policies. On economic policies Jefferson believed that the federal government should be the ones to demonstrate frugality. Although Jefferson was no “blood-soaking” radical, as several of his Federalist opponents had charged, and no reign of terror occurred once he took workplace, variety of a lot of radical Republicans pressured Jefferson and the Republican-dominated Congress to create war on the Federalist judiciary.Thomas jefferson was a cabinet officer for George Washington when he was president, where he was appointed as the secretary of state.